Quince Summer, Badger Summer, Summer of Ferns, Goose Summer... | Elyse Harney Real Estate
Elyse Harney Real Estate

Quince Summer, Badger Summer, Summer of Ferns, Goose Summer…

Photo Credit: Norman Eggert / Alamy for Travel & Leisure (West Cornwall Covered Bridge, CT)

“Indian Summer” 
Algonquin Native American term used to explain lingering warm weather in the autumn season

This November we continue to enjoy temperatures well above average in the Hudson Valley.  Algonquin Native Americans believed that these warm days were sent from the reaches of their southwestern god, Cautantowwit.  Countries throughout the world have dedicated terms to this welcomed phenomenon, ranging from Quince Summer (Spain), Badger Summer (Sweden), Summer of Ferns (Brittany), Crane Summer (Dutch), Goose Summer (Scottland), and more – regardless of the term, the return of summer’s warmth late into the fall season is always a joyful celebration.  Indian Summer is now used to loosely refer to any warm weather in the fall season – and is a strong contributor to vibrant foliage!

While leaves are soaking up abundant amounts of sunshine all summer long, the green chlorophyll overpowers the orange, red, and yellow tones. As cool autumn nights set in the chlorophyll compound in the leaves begins to break down more rapidly; exposing the beautiful color of Autumn!  Warm days slow this process, creating an elongated display of natural beauty.

This autumn, the Berkshire region has been blessed with many Indian Summer days and as a result we are surrounded by a blaze of color in every direction!  Take advantage of the views and join the Litchfield Hills in soaking up the last bits of chlorophyll while basking in the vibrancy of the Litchfield Hills.

Condé Nast Traveler video of the Hudson Valley foliage.

Click on any of the following to view some of our favorite hikes for “leaf-peeping”:
Lion’s Head in Salisbury, CT
Haystack Mountain in Norfolk, CT
Bull’s Bridge
in Kent, CT
The Cary Institute in Millbrook, NY
Bartholomew’s Cobble in Sheffield, MA
Bash Bish Falls in Mt. Washington, MA